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first, orlando being second, jacksonville being eighth. ms. brown: people approach me about jobs. they're not talking to me about the deficit. they want to know what we're doing as far as putting the american people to work. can you expound upon that for me please? ms. fudge: absolutely. i thank the gentlelady. what we have done in this budget, not only did we put in $13 billion for work force training, for job corps, for dislocated workers, retraining, segment training but in total we have almost $500 billion worth of job creation built into our budget. more than any budget, more than any budget, whether it be the democratic caucus, the white house budget or the republican budget. we have doubled down on jobs in the c.b.c. budget. ms. brown: thank you, madam chair. mr. horsford: continuing on, as the chairwoman of the c.b.c. just talked about, the congressional black caucus budget is an alternative budget for the fiscal year 2014. it puts forth a plan that reduces the deficit by $2.8 trillion over the next decade and creates millions of jobs through significant investments toward job
-- in the new spending limit at the brown in june. welfare andns on they are tough, and they affect many people. make the difficult decisions for them and the country, it would be much worse. active monetary policy and a responsible fiscal policy are two components of our plan and we need the supply side reform to put the full weight of our effort behind the entrepreneurial forces. allows hamas to rebuild and businesses to expand. reforms to schools and universities and apprentice chips are the -- apprenticeships aren't -- important and trade agreements with india and japan and the united states are part of the foreign policy and building those competitive -- in the world. and we can provide the economy with the infrastructure that it needs. investment largest in railways cents victorian times and spending more onerous than in a generation. and the treasury is now writing guarantees for major projects from the old power station site to build a new power station of tomorrow. we switched billions of pounds from current capital spending, to mitigate the sharp decline set in by the last government.
security considerations. she is also one of 30 academics contributing to the recent brown university cost of war project, which established the website following these issues. we are very fortunate to have todaysor blimes with us to address this critical and far reaching legacy of the iraq war, a war that administration officials testified at the time would pay for itself. please join me in welcoming professor linder blimes. >> thank you very much for the kind introduction. i am really pleased to be here today at this wonderful institution. as i was preparing for this talk, i was rereading some of the papers written by carnegie endowment scholars in 2002 and 2003, particularly by jessica mathews. they argued compellingly -- they were some of the few voices arguing compellingly other options the u.s. could have pursued -- and enhance inspection process the u.s. could have pursued and allow the quit their jobs. the advice was ignored. there were other voices that called for restraint. a number of voices that suggested the war could cost far more than we had anticipated. typical in the histo
by the watson institute at brown university, the war in iraq has cost $1.7 trillion, with an additional $490 billion in benefits owed to our veterans. most importantly we paid for this war most tragically in the loss of life and injury. we poured billions of dollars into nation building in iraq with little oversight or accountability. the special investigators general -- inspector general for iraq reconstruction issued his final report to congress last month detailing billions of dollars, billions of united states tax dollars lost to waste, fraud, and abuse. speaking with an iraqi official, special insector, stuart was told, you can fly in a helicopter around baghdad and other cities, but you cannot point a finger to a single project that was built and completed by the united states. mr. speaker, unfortunately these lost opportunities and tragic mistakes are not behind us. as the daughter of a 25-year veteran of the armed forces, i recognize the sacrifices our young men and women have made in iraq and continue to make in afghanistan. i am deeply concerned with the widespread incidences of pt
. could you aalab brown-waite on the negotiation with north korea and there has been some discussion of trying to level some sanctions against north korea that would maybe follow the model of other countries who had been sanctioned and i would like to know specifically what you have in mind, what could be done in a concrete way. >> first, i want to give credit for under secretary stuart levy who developed the original model back in 2005. and i did a paper, 80-page paper on this at the time in order to try to push the concepts of sanctions that would impact the hard currency, but he developed the model that was deployed on delta bank asia. and what directly led to it was the zrofferry that in macaw, they were using counterfeit bills that north korea was counterfeiting of our currency and thus we moved very, very quickly and it was enormously effective. the state department later had second thoughts about it because it raised certain issues in north korea and of course the regime at the time approached the state department and said, if you raise this, we'll come back to the negotiating
this to decisions such as plessey and brown and their significant to the african- american community. how do you think the court will weigh the legacy of those cases in their decision? three great questions. the panelists all answer however they want. anti laws or recognized as a to the traditional understanding of marriage. they were phrased that way. were in positions and a restriction on top of what marriages. by contrast this has adhered into what marriage always has been. it involves a radical redefinition to say it is not a male/female union. >> the questions involved the idea that the federal government has a long history of incentivizing marriage which is complicated. the basic posture of the federal government has been not to do anything about marriage except except state decisions. there are some benefits that help married families and windows and things like that. there are some taxes that go up. marriage it encourages economically is the complicated questions. why should whatever that is applied to people who want to marry their family members, wise? whenever you start getting into t
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6